Podcasts from IEA show related to Economics - Wealth Distribution

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Genre: Economics / Topic: Wealth Distribution
Strand: Share Radio Afternoon
Programme: IEA show
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Kate Andrews

IEA: Countering Crony Capitalism

Kate Andrews
Original Broadcast:

IEA show

IEA: Countering Crony Capitalism
Davos, the super-exclusive annual gathering of the world’s political and business elite displays all the features of a petri dish for the spread of “crony capitalism”. A tiny number of extraordinarily powerful individuals meet to discuss how the affairs of all seven billion human beings should be planned and co-ordinated. It represents an environment for the growth of regulation, intervention and enhanced barriers to entry for small businesses. All too often what we see in criticisms of capitalism are actually examples of rent-seeking and corporations trying to game the system, which amounts to crony capitalism. But has crony capitalism like that displayed in Davos become a catch-all term? The challenge for free markets, and for capitalism, is manifold: the message is tarnished, the frames are poor, and, fundamentally, the moral case for what they achieve is missing. On this week's podcast, the IEA's Digital Manager Darren Grimes is joined by the IEA’s Director General Mark Littlewood and the Director of the IEA’s FREER initiative Rebecca Lowe to discuss these challenges.
Guests:

Mark Littlewood, Darren Grimes, Rebecca Lowe


Published:
Kate Andrews

IEA: Equal Pay Day, unravelling the victim-hood narrative

Kate Andrews
Original Broadcast:

IEA show

IEA: Equal Pay Day, unravelling the victim-hood narrative
This year, Saturday November 10th was Equal Pay Day – the day the Fawcett Society calculates that women, on average, essentially start working for free, because of the gender pay gap. But Office for National Statistics calculated just a few weeks back that the pay gap is the lowest it’s ever been on record. Yet Equal Pay Day hasn’t moved. It’s the same day as it was last year. A new IEA briefing, written by Associate Director Kate Andrews and Chief Economist Julian Jessop, argues that this is a result of calculating the gender pay gap in order to obtain a figure nearly 60% higher than the official data. Kate Andrews has put together a podcast to provide ‘alternative listening’ for those who don’t want to engage in fear-mongering around women in the workplace. Kate brings together women from across the political spectrum, with diverse background and views, but who all agree on one thing – that’s that there’s a positive story to tell about women who work. She asks them all: ‘What positive message do you want to send to women today’, and also asks them for a practical policy proposal to help tackle the issues that working women still face.
Guest:

Julian Jessop


Published:
Kate Andrews

IEA: Low Energy – What a society run on green energy would look like today

Kate Andrews
Original Broadcast:

IEA show

IEA: Low Energy – What a society run on green energy would look like today
Almost everyone is in favor of advancements in green energy. But we’re still a long way off from cleaner sources being able to take over from more traditional forms of energy, like fossil fuels. If we were to make the switch now, it would inevitably mean moving from a high-energy society to a low-energy society. But what would this mean in practice? Today we’re speaking with the IEA’s Head of Education, Dr Steve Davies. Steve paints a picture of radical changes that would have to be made in order to adapt to a low-energy society. Two major changes include a return to agriculture focus in local areas, with over 30 per cent of the population needing to return to the farms to make sure communities could be fed. Furthermore, it would almost certainly mean the return of traditional gender roles, as it was the many advancements in energy in particular, that enabled women to liberate themselves out of the home and into the workforce. And while many people who advocate for a low-energy society seem to think that the things they like will continue, while the things they loathe will be scrapped, Steve argues that many conveniences, and indeed miracles, of modern society – like international plane travel and use of the internet – would be wiped out almost completely, with only the world’s elite having access to such luxuries.
Guest:

Dr Steve Davies


Published:
Kate Andrews

IEA: The World Economy; why people still feel nervous

Kate Andrews
Original Broadcast:

IEA show

IEA: The World Economy; why people still feel nervous
Despite showing good signs of health for the first time in a long time, people continue to feel anxious about the state of the world’s economy. Interviewed by the IEA’s Kate Andrews, Head of Education Dr Steve Davies explains what he believes to be the two-folded reason for this: First, the insecurity of China’s banking system, which has produced unsustainable bubbles that are bound to burst at some point. Second, the state of the world’s money system, including the extended use of quantitative easing and low interest rates, which have also created their own set of bubbles, particularly in real estate.
Guest:

Dr Steve Davies


Published: