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Gavin Oldham

Thought for the Week: Financial Legacies

Gavin Oldham
Original Broadcast:

Thought for the Week

Thought for the Week: Financial Legacies
The shining towers and ivory walls of the City of London — many of our financial trials and tribulations can be traced back to October 1986, when the clear distinction between self-interest and acting in the interests of customers was abruptly brought to an end in the 'Big Bang'. Among those who saw it all happen was legendary market-maker Brian Winterflood MBE, who died on 29th June. His financial legacy, built over sixty years in the City, is massive. Background music: 'Communicator' by Reed Mathis

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Gavin Oldham

Thought for the Week: Debt, Equity and (long-term) Risk

Gavin Oldham
Original Broadcast:

Thought for the Week

Thought for the Week: Debt, Equity and (long-term) Risk
Andrew Griffith MP, Economic Secretary to HM Treasury, wants to see a greater appetite for risk to encourage investment in British business. It's good to hear such a positive approach, but let's make it quoted-equity focused; debt and private equity are not the way forward for long-term success. Background music: 'The Nexus Riddim' by Konrad OldMoney

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Gavin Oldham

Thought for the Week: Investing in Energy

Gavin Oldham
Original Broadcast:

Thought for the Week

Thought for the Week: Investing in Energy
Dire warnings about the damage from climate change, plus the war in Ukraine, mean that we need to wean ourselves quickly off fossil fuels. However the investment markets are very slow in re-aligning opportunities in quoted investment markets: personal investors need to be able to invest in massive renewable energy projects such as Xlinks, but private equity and institutions have got in there first. We need a thorough overhaul of the investable energy sector to provide socially acceptable alternatives to fossil fuels. Background music: 'Boundless Energy' by Nate Blaze

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Gavin Oldham

Thought for the Week: Understanding Stock Ownership

Gavin Oldham
Original Broadcast:

Thought for the Week

Thought for the Week: Understanding Stock Ownership
The first SHARE conference in Cambridge last Friday provided much food for thought, and comments particularly drew attention to the need for widespread understanding of stock ownership if 'Stock for Data' is to take hold. In financial terms and because equity stock in companies is a surrogate for human enterprise, earnings from capital growth and dividends massively outperform bonds and cash over the long term; meanwhile stock owners have a key role in contributing to the governance of their companies, as employee shareownership has shown. All this needs straightforward and intelligible communication. Background music: 'Communicator' by Reed Mathis

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Gavin Oldham

Thought for the Week: Customer Stock Ownership to the Rescue?

Gavin Oldham
Original Broadcast:

Thought for the Week

Thought for the Week: Customer Stock Ownership to the Rescue?
At first sight the challenges facing TikTok and John Lewis appear very different. For the former, it's the risk of being denied access to much of the free world as regulators clamp down over concerns of it becoming a major security threat. For the latter, John Lewis's need to raise investment is threatening the partnership which staff and customers hold in such high regard. These very different problems could, however, both be solved by applying customer stock ownership — in TikTok's case, in return for the immense wealth creation made possible by data harvesting; in John Lewis's case, in return for that £2 billion which they urgently need to update their business model. In each case, disintermediation leading towards a more egalitarian form of capitalism. Background music: 'On Hold' by Silent Partner

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Gavin Oldham

Thought for the Week: Solving the AI Challenge to Wealth, Control and Intelligence

Gavin Oldham
Original Broadcast:

Thought for the Week

Thought for the Week: Solving the AI Challenge to Wealth, Control and Intelligence
The huge take-up of ChatGPT over recent weeks has brought the challenge of Artificial Intelligence into sharp relief. As the Chief Executive of its creator, OpenAI, said in one of his blogs, 'Artificial Intelligence will bring unimaginable wealth but, unless something changes, most of us will get none of it. We need a radical solution'. Conventional wisdom sees Universal Basic Income as the way through this dilemma, but this will only bring us more state intermediation and human subservience. We can put forward a better solution, by enabling all to share in the wealth that technology brings and to play their part in its future governance. Background music: 'Digital Solitude' by Silent Partner

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Gavin Oldham

Thought for the Week: Resolution in need of foundations

Gavin Oldham
Original Broadcast:

Thought for the Week

Thought for the Week: Resolution in need of foundations
The Resolution Foundation's paper 'ISA ISA Baby' released last week drew a scathing response from This Is Money, and understandably so. Their analysis of the inadequate attention given to building savings and investment in low-income families was very much on target, but they chose to accompany it with an ill thought-out and uninformed attack on the most successful long-term savings and investment plan in the United Kingdom, the Individual Savings Account. The route to a more egalitarian form of capitalism is not by attacking aspiration by penalising those who are successful and thrifty. Savings are not just for a rainy day — they bring economic freedom. Background music: 'Resolution' by Wayne Jones

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Gavin Oldham

Thought for the Week: Transforming our nation of shopkeepers into global financiers

Gavin Oldham
Original Broadcast:

Thought for the Week

Thought for the Week: Transforming our nation of shopkeepers into global financiers
Last week's rather under-stated 'Edinburgh Reforms' will pave the way for a major step forward in the UK's contribution to global financial services. In what Mark Austin describes as a 'Darwinian evolution', this broad set of regulatory changes not only frees the City from decades of living under the European Union umbrella of directives, but also continues with measures to ease over-reaction following the 2008 financial crisis. Background Music: 'The New Order' by Aaron Kenny

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Gavin Oldham

Thought for the Week: Investing Basics

Gavin Oldham
Original Broadcast:

Thought for the Week

Thought for the Week: Investing Basics
Following the past few turbulent weeks on stock markets, the launch of a new training course called ‘Investing Basics’ by the UK society for individual shareowners 'ShareSoc' comes at a good time. It will both remind seasoned investors of good practice, and help newbies understand the dynamics of the markets and the potential for good investment. After setting the scene for a fresh look at investing prospects, we invite you to find the links to the ten-video series here, via the webpage version of our Thought for this Week. Share Radio webpage for full commentary and links (incl. the videos): https://www.shareradio.co.uk/thinkingaloud/newsletters/comment-wc-2022-10-31/ Background music: 'Dark Alley Deals' by Aaron Kenny

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Gavin Oldham

Thought for the Week: Quality of life for all is the challenge

Gavin Oldham
Original Broadcast:

Thought for the Week

Thought for the Week: Quality of life for all is the challenge
The ONS reports the sharpest fall in real wages since the financial crash, but is the pain of soaring inflation shared by all? The contrast between stock market reaction so far this year and that which followed the oil price shock in the 1970s suggests that there is little comparison with those days: and yet the massive increase in fossil fuel and food prices driven by Putin's war in Ukraine is every bit as severe as then. So why, notwithstanding the fact that economic recession is expected, are stock markets so sanguine about the conditions facing us today? It has all to do with the very different impact felt by different segments of society as a result of chronic polarisation of wealth, and it explains why we need to move to a more egalitarian form of capitalism. Background music: 'Sarabande' by Joel Cummins

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