Share Sounds. from This is Money

Podcast Directory


Programme: This is Money
Clear Selection

Georgie Frost

This Is Money: Energy firms rapped for bad customer service... while still making mega profits

Georgie Frost
Original Broadcast:

This is Money

This Is Money: Energy firms rapped for bad customer service... while still making mega profits
Energy firms have had their feet held to the fire this week. The industry as a whole has been blasted by the regulator Ofgem over poor customer service, while our investigation revealed that 200 customers don't think Ovo has been billing them properly. Meanwhile, British Gas has been in the spotlight for its bumper profits, which jumped by a whopping 889 per cent for the first half of this year. These firms are certainly making plenty of money - so should they be spending more of it to help their customers? Lee Boyce, Helen Crane and Georgie Frost ask why things are going so wrong, and what people can do if they don't think they are being billed correctly. We also look at what's going on with bank accounts. Crisis-hit Natwest is winning the switching battle thanks to its tasty cash incentives, and it’s not just Farage being 'de-banked'. We hear the story of one vulnerable couple who were left unable to pay bills and buy food after HSBC closed their account. Inheritance tax has also been in the news, as there are noises it might be scrapped - but the Treasury are raking in even more money from it. Will it go? Finally, we explain what blended families need to know about making a will - after one woman was forced to bid for her late mother's belongings at auction when her stepfather amended their mirror wills after she had died.
Guest:

Helen Crane


Published:
Georgie Frost

This Is Money: Inflation eases to 7.9% - what does that mean for mortgage and savings rates?

Georgie Frost
Original Broadcast:

This is Money

This Is Money: Inflation eases to 7.9% - what does that mean for mortgage and savings rates?
Earlier in the week, the consumer prices index measure of inflation fell by more than expected thanks to a fall in transport and food prices. It eased to 7.9% in June, a bigger drop than expected, according to the Office for National Statistics. This was the lowest CPI rate since March 2022 when inflationary pressures began to amplify the headline figure. So what does that mean for the typical household and for potential future base rate rises? Lee Boyce, Sam Barker and Georgie Frost delve into CPI and what that means for mortgages and savers. And on the note of savers, two pieces of data this week point to a mixed picture for our financial resilience. On one hand, a survey suggests one in three people do not have enough savings for an emergency - and on the other, that a third of savers are earning 1% or less, and for some that's on five figure pots. If inflation does stay sticky, pensioners could see a big rise in in the state pension - if politicians keep the 'triple lock' pledge. Data suggests that by 2030, the annual state pension figure is likely to be between £13,000 and £14,000. Before you head off on holiday, we reveal the cruel new scams you need to know about. And… bitcoin to surge to $120,000 by the end of 2024 according to one major bank. How likely is that and why does one expert think it's nonsense.
Guest:

Sam Barker


Published:
Georgie Frost

This Is Money: Do you really want your pension invested in risky unlisted companies?

Georgie Frost
Original Broadcast:

This is Money

This Is Money: Do you really want your pension invested in risky unlisted companies?
Chancellor Jeremy Hunt is looking for more risk to be taken in pensions - is this right? And should they not first sort out the estimated ten million errors in state pension records? Meanwhile one million people will be paying an additional £5,000 per annum on mortgage payments: could the Bank of England have done more? And finally - would Britain be safer if only women were allowed to drive?

Published:
Georgie Frost

This Is Money: How investors can back AI - Simon Lambert speaks to Sam North

Georgie Frost
Original Broadcast:

This is Money

This Is Money: How investors can back AI - Simon Lambert speaks to Sam North
Artificial intelligence has burst into the headlines over the past year and generated excitement among investors. But as with any exciting new technology that has generated a lot of hype, there will be pitfalls for investors along the way. If you want to invest in the AI revolution, what other companies could benefit and what do you need to consider. This is Money's Simon Lambert speaks to eToro’s Sam North to find out more.
Guest:

Sam North


Published:
Georgie Frost

This Is Money: Could your bank really close YOUR current account with little warning?

Georgie Frost
Original Broadcast:

This is Money

This Is Money: Could your bank really close YOUR current account with little warning?
Banks have come into the firing line this week over current account closures and slowness to pass on base rate rises to savers. Nigel Farage claims his bank shut his current account over his Brexit views – the former politician has been vocal on Twitter about his treatment by Coutts, while the exclusive bank with a high net wealth clientele has fired back. So, can banks realistically do that to you? Georgie Frost, Simon Lambert and Lee Boyce tell you all the reasons your bank can close your current account – and what to do if it happen to you. And on the same day big bank bosses faced a grilling from the FCA about paying savers fairly, Lloyds, Halifax and HSBC hike rates – coincidence? Savings deals have been rocketing in recent months, experts give their views on whether we’re at a peak – or if there is further still to go for savers. With savings rates rising, many are questioning whether to bother investing - one think-tank reckons Britons are ploughing far too much into cash instead of investing. How do the figures stack up? And finally… would you pay into your partner’s pension? A spouse can pay into their partner's pension while they are not working to ensure they do not miss out financially in later life, but is it a wise move?

Published:
Georgie Frost

This Is Money: Energy price cap falling and savings rates race past the 6% barrier

Georgie Frost
Original Broadcast:

This is Money

This Is Money: Energy price cap falling and savings rates race past the 6% barrier
There has been plenty of doom and gloom in recent months – and today, we go searching for cheerier news. The energy price cap will fall from the weekend, plunging to £2,074 – below the £2,500 set Energy Price Guarantee from the Government. So, what should you be doing to prepare – and what does that mean for your usage? Will we soon see the return of fixed tariffs? Georgie Frost, Helen Crane and Lee Boyce discuss the new price cap, along with a sneaky move from a major energy supplier to stop quarterly billing. Mortgage rates are rising – that's not good news for homeowners coming up to remortgage. However, there is some good news… This is Money has a new Navigate the Mortgage Maze column written by L&C broker David Hollingworth. We reveal what the column is all about and details of the first one, which covers a question on many lips: how do I overpay and take advantage of a low fixed rate as much as possible? There has been a flurry of new saving deals, with the top rates now nudging past 6% – challenger banks are driving the rises, but even bigger banks are boosting some deals. Personalised licence plates on cars have surged in popularity – but why? And what makes one worth a five-figure sum? Can you live without sat nav, parking sensors, heated seats and a… CD player in your car? A new survey reveals the motoring gadgets we can't live without. We talk about the scammer turned good who is worried about AI and fraud. And what money stories did Helen bring back from her Glastonbury adventure?
Guest:

Helen Crane


Published:
Georgie Frost

This Is Money: Was hiking interest rates again the right move or is the Bank of England in panic mode?

Georgie Frost
Original Broadcast:

This is Money

This Is Money: Was hiking interest rates again the right move or is the Bank of England in panic mode?
The Bank of England’s bumper 0.5% rate hike this week was the 13th rise in a row. After sitting on their hands for more than a decade, ratesetters have been shaken out of their slumbers by an inflation storm. By historic standards 5% is not high for interest rates, but unfortunately for borrowers we also started from a historic low and have gone from 0.1% to here in just 18 months. The belated headlong rush into raising rates is also the exact opposite of what the Bank of England spent years assuring homeowners would happen: the party line used to be ‘gradual and limited’. The Bank is hiking rates to try to crush inflation but at the same time this affects a much smaller slice of homeowners than it once did and rapid rise in mortgage costs is crushing a generation of homeowners. So, was another rate rise a wise move? How bad is the pain for borrowers? Is this not a patch on the '80s, or just as bad? Has the Bank of England even given its rate rises long enough to take effect? On this rate rise special podcast, Georgie Frost, Lee Boyce and Simon Lambert tackle all that and more.

Published:
Georgie Frost

This Is Money: Mortgage mayhem, savings frenzy: What on earth is going on?

Georgie Frost
Original Broadcast:

This is Money

This Is Money: Mortgage mayhem, savings frenzy: What on earth is going on?
The mortgage market is mayhem, with lenders pulling deals and rapidly hiking rates. Average fixed mortgage rates have soared over the past month and we are now at the stage where it looks a lot like the panic after the mini-Budget. At the same time savings rates are going gangbusters and there is barely a day that passes without a new best buy. Meanwhile, UK gilt yields have also leapt, sending the UK’s borrowing costs even higher. What on earth is going on? Georgie Frost, Helen Crane and Simon Lambert dive in and try to explain why the sudden inflation-driven chaos has kicked off and what borrowers and savers can do. What should you do if you need a mortgage? Is this a prime time to grab a savings deal or should you wait for better rates? How does it compare to the double-digit rates days of the 1980s? What does this mean for the economy? Are we all doomed? Or will this pass? Listen to find out their views and get tips on how to sort your mortgage and savings.
Guest:

Helen Crane


Published:
Georgie Frost

This Is Money: Money for nothing: Is universal basic income a good idea?

Georgie Frost
Original Broadcast:

This is Money

This Is Money: Money for nothing: Is universal basic income a good idea?
Universal basic income is a controversial idea and not just because it's money for nothing. Paying everyone a set amount every month as a baseline level of income has intrigued economists and central bank geeks for years. Supporters say it has the power to improve physical and mental health and the economy and society, but critics say it's the start of a slippery slope to state dependency and control. A new proposed trial for 30 people in the UK to get £1,600 a month has put the topic back on the agenda. So — is universal basic income a good or bad idea? Georgie Frost, Lee Boyce and Simon Lambert discuss it on this episode. Also — why aren't our energy bills lower if wholesale prices have plummeted? What can you do if you are caught in the mortgage storm? And finally, which UK shares have done best and worst so far this year?

Published:
Georgie Frost

This Is Money: Inflation-busting savings rates of 9% and Cash ISAs back in the sun as billions pour into them

Georgie Frost
Original Broadcast:

This is Money

This Is Money: Inflation-busting savings rates of 9% and Cash ISAs back in the sun as billions pour into them
Forget 5% savings rates. Forget 7%. A new regular savings deal has landed paying a headline-grabbing 9%. But, is it actually a good deal? Saffron Building Society aren't the only savings provider pumping up rates, with fixed-rates now hitting 5.25%. And Cash ISAs are back with a bang with a record amount poured into tax-free accounts in March and April. That comes as more savers look to shield their money from the taxman, with more potentially busting their Personal Savings Allowance this year. Georgie Frost, Lee Boyce and Helen Crane discuss all things savings and why people should be tracking down better rates. The debate moves on to housing, with one property price index suggesting an annual value fall of 3.4%. So what's going on? Mortgage deals are being pulled left, right and centre and the amount borrowed in new mortgages dips a record low. Where is it all heading? Plus, Lee argues that tech giant Meta needs to listen to big banks and take the huge volume of social media scams more seriously. Helen gives a big update on her Crane on the Case column and the great dishes debate finally resolved: Is it cheaper to wash up by hand or use a dishwasher?
Guest:

Helen Crane


Published: