Podcasts related to Economics - UK

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Genre: Economics / Topic: UK
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Kate Andrews

IEA: The Future of Liberalism in the USA

Kate Andrews
Original Broadcast:

IEA show

IEA: The Future of Liberalism in the USA
Here in the UK, we hear a great deal about the Donald Trump administration – but how do we get past the hyperbole and hysteria to figure out what’s really going on across the pond. Today we’re joined by Dr Tom Palmer, a Senior Fellow at the Cato Institute and Vice President for International Programs at the Atlas Network. Interviewed by the IEA’s News Editor Kate Andrews, Tom discusses the President’s modus operandi, his top priorities – and the internal workings of the White House. They also evaluate the success of Donald Trump’s tax reforms – and whether his reluctance to find common cause with Democrats may make it more likely that these reforms could ultimately be overturned.
Guest:

Dr Tom Palmer


Published:
Ed Bowsher

The Big Call: How to invest your money in a world of rising interest rates

Ed Bowsher
Original Broadcast:

The Big Call

The Big Call: How to invest your money in a world of rising interest rates
Interest rates and bond yields are slowly starting to rise in 2018, so it’s a good time to ask what investors should do with their money as we begin to return to a world of monetary normality. Is it time to get out of bonds? Or stay in shares? Ed Bowsher asks James Butterfill, investment strategist, Sean Corrigan of Cantillon Consulting and Russ Mould of AJ Bell.
Guests:

James Butterfill, Sean Corrigan


Published:
Kate Andrews

IEA: Are Too Many People Going to University?

Kate Andrews
Original Broadcast:

IEA show

IEA: Are Too Many People Going to University?
The herd mentality that assumes university is the only path to reaching one’s full potential has come under fire in recent years. Student loan debt – and the interest on that debt – is rising, and yet a university degree certainly seems to be no guarantee of securing decent, highly-skilled jobs. Today we’re joined by Professor Len Shackleton, Editorial Fellow at the IEA. Interviewed by Digital Officer Madeline Grant, the pair discuss whether Britain’s love affair with higher education is sustainable, and whether students are getting a raw deal from their time at university. They also examine ways in which the university funding model could be reformed to create better outcomes for students and the wider economy.
Guests:

Professor Len Shackleton, Madeline Grant


Published:
Georgie Frost

This is Money: What did Charles Ponzi do - and is money flipping the dumbest scheme yet?

Georgie Frost
Original Broadcast:

This is Money

This is Money: What did Charles Ponzi do - and is money flipping the dumbest scheme yet?
Ever heard of money flipping? It’s a new scheme doing the rounds on Facebook and social media that promises to turn your £50 into potentially thousands. So how do you do that? Simple really, you pay others to get onto the bottom rung of a pyramid and then recruit more people to move you up a level and get paid yourself. What makes it so dumb is that it doesn’t even try to have the legitimate veneer of famous pyramid schemes of the past. It’s a Ponzi scheme, plain and simple, but what is one of those and who was Charles Ponzi, the man the scams are named after. On this week’s podcast, Simon Lambert, Lee Boyce and Georgie Frost step back to America in 1920 to find out how Ponzi soared and then crashed – and look at the new money flipping scheme that has brought a trick as old as time to today’s digital age.
Guests:

Simon Lambert, Lee Boyce


Published:
Franz Buscha

Policy Matters: The role of education in social mobility

Franz Buscha
Original Broadcast:

Policy Matters

Policy Matters: The role of education in social mobility
In this episode of Policy Matters, hosts Franz Buscha and Matt Dickson are joined by Dr Lindsey Macmillan from University College London to discuss the role of education in social mobility. Issues relating to education are never far from the policy agenda or the headlines – whether it is early years education, university tuition fees or the possible return of grammar schools. But what does academic research tell us about the role of education at each age and stage in improving life-chances of children from poorer backgrounds, and what does this mean for policy? Franz and Matt discuss these issues with Lindsey; and also consider the limits as to what education policy can achieve, given the way that the UK labour market – and wider society – is structured.
Guests:

Matt Dickson, Dr Lindsey Macmillan


Published:
Georgie Frost

This is Money: How to buy a home with less than £10,000, but is a small deposit mortgage wise?

Georgie Frost
Original Broadcast:

This is Money

This is Money: How to buy a home with less than £10,000, but is a small deposit mortgage wise?
High house prices mean that the biggest barrier to buying a home in Britain is raising a deposit. With mortgage interest rates at near record low levels, many would-be homeowners could afford monthly payments - but saving the average £30,000 deposit would take years. For a lot of first-time buyers that means a trip to the Bank of Mum and Dad, but what if that's not an option? It is possible to buy a home without raising tens of thousands of pounds, if you take a 95% mortgage. With one of these deals, a first-time buyer able to pass mortgage affordability tests could put down a 5% deposit of £10,000 and buy a £200,000 home. But is that a good idea? Didn't small deposit mortgages crash the economy a decade ago? Are they not leaving themselves heavily overexposed to falling house prices? In this week's podcast, Simon Lambert and Georgie Frost dig into the world of buying a home with a small deposit mortgage, busting the myths and considering the benefits and the risks.
Guest:

Simon Lambert


Published:
Kate Andrews

IEA: Robocalypse Now?

Kate Andrews
Original Broadcast:

IEA show

IEA: Robocalypse Now?
The advance of AI and robotics brings many challenges as well as huge opportunities – and public concern about changes in the labour market has been mounting in recent years. But is our pessimism justified? Len Shackleton - the IEA’s Editorial Fellow and author of a recent report into robotics and the future of work - speaks to Digital Officer Madeline Grant, and examines whether we might be overstating our predictions of widespread job loss. They also evaluate some of the policies currently being proposed by politicians in response to these emerging technologies.
Guest:

Len Shackleton


Published:
Kate Andrews

IEA: What’s Next For The Special Relationship?

Kate Andrews
Original Broadcast:

IEA show

IEA: What’s Next For The Special Relationship?
The past 18 months have been a political whirlwind in both the UK and USA. Britain’s departure from the European Union presents the opportunity for a free trade deal to be forged between the two countries. But will the opportunities be seized upon in a timely manner, or at all? Today the IEA’s Director General Mark Littlewood speaks to Michael Carnuccio, President and CEO of the E Foundation for Oklahoma, a think tank aiming to grow Oklahoma State’s prosperity in the long term. Michael also gives an update on politics overseas, his assessment of President Donald Trump’s first year in office, and his predictions for the November midterm elections.
Guests:

Mark Littlewood, Michael Carnuccio


Published:
Peter Urwin

Economist Questions: Generational Diversity and Intergenerational Fairness

Peter Urwin
Original Broadcast:

Economist Questions

Economist Questions: Generational Diversity and Intergenerational Fairness
Interest in generational diversity has exploded since the turn of the 21st century, especially in Marketing and HRM. While many researchers are supportive of the concept of generations, a growing number have questioned the validity of the idea that people are psychologically different according to when they were born. In this interview, Peter Urwin speaks to Cranfield University’s Professor Emma Parry to discover what the research has to say about Generations X, Y and Z; why the findings from existing studies must be treated with caution; and why a lot of this work risks stereotyping certain age groups.
Guest:

Emma Parry


Published:
Georgie Frost

This is Money: The rise of the Money Mules - What are banks doing to combat the gangs targeting our kids?

Georgie Frost
Original Broadcast:

This is Money

This is Money: The rise of the Money Mules - What are banks doing to combat the gangs targeting our kids?
Also today: How concerned should we be about interest-only mortgages? Simon gets angry about potholes! And Sainsbury's boss may be in the money – but with a potential tie-up with Asda in the offing, what’s in it for the shoppers?
Guest:

Simon Lambert


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