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Gavin Oldham

Thought for the Week: Say Farewell to Socialism, Sir Keir

Gavin Oldham
Original Broadcast:

Thought for the Week

Thought for the Week: Say Farewell to Socialism, Sir Keir
Spot the difference (if you can) between the communist and socialist perspectives on welfare, as defined by byjus.com. After seventy-five years it's crippled the public sector with its huge demand for cash, and provides a dysfunctional health service due to monopoly strangleholds. It's time for Sir Keir Starmer to move from socialism to egalitarian capitalism: You won't find it in Party manifestos, but you will find it at Share Alliance. Background music: 'People Watching' by Sir Cubworth

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Georgie Frost

This Is Money: What could the general election mean for your money?

Georgie Frost
Original Broadcast:

This is Money

This Is Money: What could the general election mean for your money?
The Prime Minister put an end to all the speculation this week by giving us the date for the general election: July 4. That comes as the latest inflation reading was 2.3%, a little above forecasts making a base rate cut next month now unlikely. Simon Lambert, Georgie Frost and Lee Boyce delve into the economic state of affairs and what the upcoming election could mean for your money, when it comes to tax, pensions, property and everything in-between. Nationwide Building Society posted pre-tax profits of £1.77bn this week and as a result, it is dishing out another year of 'Fairer Share' loyalty payouts of £100 — will you qualify? And not only that, it is now offering £200 to switchers and an exclusive 5.5% loyalty savings rate. How does early retirement sound to you? It seems it appeals to a lot of us because searches on Google for 'retire early' have increased threefold in the last decade. But how much would you be willing to sacrifice to achieve it? At the extreme end, we have the FIRE movement, advocating saving 70% of your income. Special guest, former This is Money editor Andrew Oxlade, had had enough — he explains why. Lastly, This is Money has a new regular series called Modern Treasures with valuation expert Dan Hatfield — Lee reveals all about the first one, all about first edition books, and gives details on how to get YOUR items valued for free.

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Gavin Oldham

Thought for the Week: AI raises the urgency for disintermediated participation

Gavin Oldham
Original Broadcast:

Thought for the Week

Thought for the Week: AI raises the urgency for disintermediated participation
Professor Hinton, the 'godfather of AI' warns that the challenges of Artificial Intelligence are not just economic but also strategic. His quotation of Putin shows clearly the need for a convergent approach towards these risks. And remember the Bletchley conference just six months ago? The scientists have lost no time in preparing their interim report, but there's much to be done in planning the best way forward. Background music: 'Metamorphosis' by Quincas Moreira

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Georgie Frost

This Is Money: Should the Bank of England have cut interest rates instead of holding firm?

Georgie Frost
Original Broadcast:

This is Money

This Is Money: Should the Bank of England have cut interest rates instead of holding firm?
The Bank of England decided to hold the base rate for the sixth time in a row this week – but was it the right decision? Should the MPC have been bold and made a cut? What does it mean for our mortgages and savings? And when will a move come - and in what direction? Georgie Frost, Simon Lambert and Lee Boyce talk about the base rate decision and what happens next. In the world of property, the number of homes being devalued is on the rise. So, what's going on? And what can you do if it happens to you? Bungalows are having a moment. They're not just for the elderly and downsizers, young families and first time buyers are also increasingly interested - pushing the price of them higher since the pandemic. Energy firms have been trying to push smart meters on us for years: have they uncovered a new trick to get us to make the swap? And finally, it's been good news for JD Wetherspoon - the no frills pub chain said it expects annual profits to come in towards the 'top end' of forecasts. Where do you stand on Spoons? Lee and Simon face-off with different pints of view on the pub giant.

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Gavin Oldham

Thought for the Week: Putting Dormant Assets to Work

Gavin Oldham
Original Broadcast:

Thought for the Week

Thought for the Week: Putting Dormant Assets to Work
Just in the United Kingdom alone, it has been estimated that there is £200 billion lying unclaimed as dormant assets. Better analysis is needed, more use should be made of search facilities by families — but the money needs to be put to work, prioritising inter-generational rebalancing. The Dormant Assets Act 2022 is a major step forward by Government, and the Reclaim Fund will enable its provisions to be put into practice. This will become an increasingly important contribution to empowering disadvantaged young people as the birth rate falls. Background music: 'Sea of Ancestry' by Jesse Gallagher.

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Gavin Oldham

Thought for the Week: Private Equity undermining the UK’s role in global finance

Gavin Oldham
Original Broadcast:

Thought for the Week

Thought for the Week: Private Equity undermining the UK’s role in global finance
The Bank of England has sounded its strongest warnings yet of the danger to financial stability from Private Equity, and the London Evening Standard simultaneously reported the serious attrition of London Stock Exchange trading activity. We explain the close connection between these, and call for a more global perspective. It's important that both Finance and Government rise to this challenge, so that the United Kingdom can continue to provide a leading role in the development of the global manifesto for which we called on 2nd January. Background music: 'Dark Alley Deals' by Aaron Kenny

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Georgie Frost

This Is Money: Will the Bank of England cut rates as soon as people think?

Georgie Frost
Original Broadcast:

This is Money

This Is Money: Will the Bank of England cut rates as soon as people think?
The Bank of England held interest rates again this week as inflation dropped once more. So, are we out of the woods yet? Will inflation keep coming back down towards target and the Bank of England soon seamlessly switch back to cutting rates? Or will central bankers be keen to hold onto higher rates, even if we get hit by a bout of disinflation? Georgie Frost, Lee Boyce and Simon Lambert look at what next for inflation and interest rates and what it means for your money. Also, should the Waspi women who saw their state pension age rise rapidly be compensated for the poor communication and how much of a victory was this week’s Parliamentary Ombudsman Waspi report a victory for them? As that happened, more news emerged on underpaid state pensions – as exposed by our Tanya Jefferies and pension columnist Sir Steve Webb, and the team update us on that. Plus, what’s going on with the chaos at HMRC and who is to blame for the failure to keep up with our increasingly tricky tax system. And finally, meet the Scambaiters – we find out what they do and why.

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Gavin Oldham

Thought for the Week: Shifting the Burden Stealthily

Gavin Oldham
Original Broadcast:

Thought for the Week

Thought for the Week: Shifting the Burden Stealthily
Jeremy Hunt's focus on young working people, by making a further significant reduction in employees' NI, is welcome; but his overall strategy is cloaked in disguise. As Michael Gove made clear in February, young people need direct economic encouragement: for example, the omission of any mention of unclaimed adult-owned CTFs indicates more of a studied indifference from HM Treasury. Background music: 'Hidden Agenda' by Kevin MacLeod - http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1200102

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Gavin Oldham

The Financial Outlook: UK Budget as delivered on 6 March 2024

Gavin Oldham
Original Broadcast:

The Financial Outlook for Personal Investors

The Financial Outlook: UK Budget as delivered on 6 March 2024
The full unabridged UK Budget speech as delivered by Chancellor Jeremy Hunt in the House of Commons on Wednesday 6th March 2024, without additional comment.

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Georgie Frost

This Is Money: Was the Budget too little, too late or what we need for escape velocity?

Georgie Frost
Original Broadcast:

This is Money

This Is Money: Was the Budget too little, too late or what we need for escape velocity?
Jeremy Hunt bounced around delivering his Budget on Wednesday, proudly declaring his commitment to tax cuts and supporting working families. Another 2% was chopped off National Insurance and the threshold at which child benefit is removed was raised from £50,000 to £60,000. But you don’t need to be a financial expert to know that the Chancellor’s version of events isn’t quite the whole story. Because Mr Hunt is also presiding over a long-term stealth tax freeze to thresholds that is costing workers dear and his child benefit move merely kicked sky-high marginal tax rates down the road, rather than getting rid of them altogether. Nonetheless, a tax cut and an extra £5,000 Isa allowance – even if it’s a slightly iffy, limited one – is not to be sniffed at. So, was this an escape velocity Budget that puts Britain back on the path to growth? Or was it too little, too late, from a Tory party that has sported successive Chancellors who have been keener to raise our taxes by hook or by crook rather than cut them – or even just keep thresholds in line with inflation? Georgie Frost, Lee Boyce and Simon Lambert look at the winners and losers and go searching for the devils in the detail. What is the National Insurance cut worth to you? Will you get some child benefit back? Did pensioners deserve a tax cut too? With a failure to reverse his capital gains and dividend tax raid, what has the Chancellor got against small investors? And will the British ISA be any good? All that and more – plus a look at why Nationwide is buying Virgin Money, and whether that’s good or bad for us all.

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