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Georgie Frost

This Is Money: Mortgage mayhem, savings frenzy: What on earth is going on?

Georgie Frost
Original Broadcast:

This is Money

This Is Money: Mortgage mayhem, savings frenzy: What on earth is going on?
The mortgage market is mayhem, with lenders pulling deals and rapidly hiking rates. Average fixed mortgage rates have soared over the past month and we are now at the stage where it looks a lot like the panic after the mini-Budget. At the same time savings rates are going gangbusters and there is barely a day that passes without a new best buy. Meanwhile, UK gilt yields have also leapt, sending the UK’s borrowing costs even higher. What on earth is going on? Georgie Frost, Helen Crane and Simon Lambert dive in and try to explain why the sudden inflation-driven chaos has kicked off and what borrowers and savers can do. What should you do if you need a mortgage? Is this a prime time to grab a savings deal or should you wait for better rates? How does it compare to the double-digit rates days of the 1980s? What does this mean for the economy? Are we all doomed? Or will this pass? Listen to find out their views and get tips on how to sort your mortgage and savings.
Guest:

Helen Crane


Published:
Adam Cox

Modern Mindset: Dean Hodgson on 60 Years of Plumbing

Adam Cox
Original Broadcast:

Modern Mindset

Modern Mindset: Dean Hodgson on 60 Years of Plumbing
Adam Cox is joined by Dean Hodgson, from Dyno-Rod, to commemorate the 60th anniversary of the brand's dedicated service to plumbing nationwide. They engage in a conversation highlighting the significant transformations that the industry has witnessed and successfully embraced in the past six decades. They explore recent research findings that shed light on the British population's comprehension of plumbing, and, Dean offers valuable suggestions for individuals seeking to minimise expenditure on repairs when lacking the necessary DIY expertise to tackle the issues themselves. https://www.dyno.com/
Guest:

Dean Hodgson


Published:
Georgie Frost

This Is Money: Money for nothing: Is universal basic income a good idea?

Georgie Frost
Original Broadcast:

This is Money

This Is Money: Money for nothing: Is universal basic income a good idea?
Universal basic income is a controversial idea and not just because it's money for nothing. Paying everyone a set amount every month as a baseline level of income has intrigued economists and central bank geeks for years. Supporters say it has the power to improve physical and mental health and the economy and society, but critics say it's the start of a slippery slope to state dependency and control. A new proposed trial for 30 people in the UK to get £1,600 a month has put the topic back on the agenda. So — is universal basic income a good or bad idea? Georgie Frost, Lee Boyce and Simon Lambert discuss it on this episode. Also — why aren't our energy bills lower if wholesale prices have plummeted? What can you do if you are caught in the mortgage storm? And finally, which UK shares have done best and worst so far this year?

Published:
Georgie Frost

This Is Money: Inflation-busting savings rates of 9% and Cash ISAs back in the sun as billions pour into them

Georgie Frost
Original Broadcast:

This is Money

This Is Money: Inflation-busting savings rates of 9% and Cash ISAs back in the sun as billions pour into them
Forget 5% savings rates. Forget 7%. A new regular savings deal has landed paying a headline-grabbing 9%. But, is it actually a good deal? Saffron Building Society aren't the only savings provider pumping up rates, with fixed-rates now hitting 5.25%. And Cash ISAs are back with a bang with a record amount poured into tax-free accounts in March and April. That comes as more savers look to shield their money from the taxman, with more potentially busting their Personal Savings Allowance this year. Georgie Frost, Lee Boyce and Helen Crane discuss all things savings and why people should be tracking down better rates. The debate moves on to housing, with one property price index suggesting an annual value fall of 3.4%. So what's going on? Mortgage deals are being pulled left, right and centre and the amount borrowed in new mortgages dips a record low. Where is it all heading? Plus, Lee argues that tech giant Meta needs to listen to big banks and take the huge volume of social media scams more seriously. Helen gives a big update on her Crane on the Case column and the great dishes debate finally resolved: Is it cheaper to wash up by hand or use a dishwasher?
Guest:

Helen Crane


Published:
Georgie Frost

This Is Money: When will energy bills fall, and could the fixed tariff finally be making a return?

Georgie Frost
Original Broadcast:

This is Money

This Is Money: When will energy bills fall, and could the fixed tariff finally be making a return?
We had some good news this week about our energy bills - or did we? Ofgem's price cap is coming down - saving households around £400 a year on average. The last 18 months have been horrendous for households, so bad the Government had to step in in October and introduce a price freeze - but that was still double what the typical bill payer would have had to fork out a year previously. And although the cap is coming down, the removal of Government grants means most people will actually only be saving about £19 per month, or £225 per year. So what will we have to pay when the new cap starts in July, will bills keep going down, and when will energy companies start under-cutting the price cap with fixed tariffs again? Georgie Frost, Helen Crane and Simon Lambert discuss when energy bills might go back to 'normal', and whether we should jump on fixed deals when they return, or treat them with caution. We also got the latest UK inflation figures this week. Despite a not insignificant drop from 10.1% to 8.7% in April, experts are pricing in another interest rate rise - and that is down to a surprise jump in something called core inflation. We explain what that is, and discuss just how high the base rate might go. We look at why that is happening, and take in some advice from brokers on what those with a remortgage deadline coming up should do. But with bad news for mortgage holders comes good news for savers, with easy-access rates edging ever closer to 4%. We list the best buys. The US debt ceiling has also been in the news this week, with the two main parties engaged in a stand-off about whether it should be raised. If it isn't, the world's biggest economy could default on its debts - but what exactly would that mean, and how big is the risk? Finally, with warmer weather on the way we discuss the new phenomenon of 'campervanflation', and why the younger generation can't seem to get enough of the classic VW Camper.
Guest:

Helen Crane


Published:
Georgie Frost

This Is Money: How high will interest rates go — and why are they still going up?

Georgie Frost
Original Broadcast:

This is Money

This Is Money: How high will interest rates go — and why are they still going up?
And there it was, another interest rate hike. Another quarter point move up seems almost commonplace now, but cast your mind back to the era after the financial crisis and we had to wait nearly ten years for the base rate to climb above its 0.5% 'emergency level'. It cut first and then base rate got all the way to the heady heights of 0.75%, before it was cut again when Covid hit. Yet, less than 18 months since the Bank of England started raising rates in December 2021, base rate has rocketed from 0.1% to 4.5%. The rate itself is still relatively low in historic terms, but the magnitude of the rise is not. So, are the Bank's ratesetters right to keep voting for hikes, has the full pain been felt yet, and why would you do this when all the forecasts suggest inflation is soon to nosedive? Georgie Frost, Tanya Jefferies and Simon Lambert discuss the latest rate rise and how high interest rates will go. Plus, is the return of the 100% mortgage absolute madness, a helping hand for trapped renters, or something in the middle of all that? Why people should claim pension credit or help their friends or relatives? And finally, not only will it lack the crisp one-liners of Succession, but an inheritance drama is not something you want to get into, so how can people avoid one?
Guest:

Tanya Jefferies


Published:
Georgie Frost

This Is Money: How can we build more homes and make them better?

Georgie Frost
Original Broadcast:

This is Money

This Is Money: How can we build more homes and make them better?
A row over housebuilding has erupted again. Labour leader Keir Starmer has said he would bring back a 300,000 annual housebuilding target, after Rishi Sunak scrapped it. Meanwhile, some backbench Tory MPs are reportedly unhappy about their party ditching that target in the first place – with the number having featured in the 2019 Conservative Party manifesto. At the same time Michael Gove has been cheered in many quarters for blocking a development in Kent, as it was deemed to be poor quality and ugly, but is now being taken to court by developer Berkeley Homes over the decision. So, what can we do about housebuilding and how do we get ourselves out of this mess – especially as the younger generation are squeezed out by high house prices and rents? Georgie Frost, Lee Boyce and Simon Lambert dig into the myriad problems with UK housebuilding and what can be done to build better homes that people want to buy and have near them. Is the answer just bringing back targets or is it more complicated than that? Is not wanting housing developments Nimbyism if there’s a failure to build well and deliver infrastructure? How can we convince local communities to back new housing? All this and more come up for debate. Also, if you are in the fortunate position of being able to buy a home but are worried about falling house prices and locking into high mortgage rates, what should you do? Sam North, of eToro, joins us for the latest market update, including the reaction to the Fed's latest rate rise. Will a new crackdown on scams finally stop the fraudsters? And finally, we said it was coming. The 5% savings rate is back, but should you get one?
Guest:

Sam North


Published:
Georgie Frost

This Is Money: Home improvement snakes and ladders: How to add value - and how to lose it

Georgie Frost
Original Broadcast:

This is Money

This Is Money: Home improvement snakes and ladders: How to add value - and how to lose it
What's the best home improvement plans, if you're thinking about selling? Has the dust now settled following the banking sell-offs — is it a good time to invest now? Will Schroder's UK private/public trusts ever be able to shake off the Neil Woodford legacy? Georgie Frost and Simon Lambert discuss these issues, and the This Is Money 'Best Buy' savings table.

Published:
Adam Cox

Modern Mindset: Steven Bailey on Outdoor Wood Care

Adam Cox
Original Broadcast:

Modern Mindset

Modern Mindset: Steven Bailey on Outdoor Wood Care
Adam Cox is joined by Steven Bailey, from Barrettine, to discuss why it is so important to care for wood outside, and the environmental issues that should be considered when doing so. Steven explains the best time of year to carry out woodcare projects, and how to save grey wood. www.bestwoodcare.co.uk
Guest:

Steven Bailey


Published:
Georgie Frost

This Is Money: How long should you fix your mortgage for - and what next for rates?

Georgie Frost
Original Broadcast:

This is Money

This Is Money: How long should you fix your mortgage for - and what next for rates?
As if buying a home wasn’t enough of a lottery, borrowers are now facing a major gamble on their mortgage. Whether buying or remortgaging, they need to work out how long to fix for and try to assess what might happen next to interest rates. On the basis that even the world’s top economists and investors didn’t spot the past year’s sudden interest rate spike coming and can’t agree on what central banks will do next, that’s a tough task. Five-year fixed rates are cheaper than two-year fixed rates, but borrowers worry they risk locking in at higher rates for longer. Meanwhile, trackers are pricier but could fall if the base rate comes down, although there’s not much agreement on when the Bank of England will stop hiking or how swiftly it will lower rates when it eventually does. Georgie Frost, Helen Crane and Simon Lambert discuss the great mortgage gamble and what people can do. Also, the house price hotspots of the past decade – and why living in a place where home values has doubled may not be a good thing. Simon takes a look at UK shares, why they are considered cheap and whether they are a decent investment or not. Helen talks through her latest 'Crane on the Case' and how it involved a loyal BA customer locked out of a staggering number of Avios points and getting a raw deal from the airline on sorting it out. And finally, here is a test of your age: how well do you remember the Ford Orion, Austin Maestro and Vauxhall Nova — and did you ever believe that one day they’d be classic cars?
Guest:

Helen Crane


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