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Simon Rose

Gadgets & Gizmos: Bunny hops in the garage, haptic gloves & electric car troubles

Simon Rose
Original Broadcast:

Gadgets and Gizmos

Gadgets & Gizmos: Bunny hops in the garage, haptic gloves & electric car troubles
Steve Caplin discussses the latest tech with Simon Rose. Mountain bikers can practise bunny hops in their garage with the Garage Bunny. Haptic gloves should add realistic touch to the world of immersive VR. A new riot gun won't fire at anyone's head. It's been proven that bad grammar causes real stress. The Guardian has collated some of the worst stories of electric cars going rogue. There's a chair for when you're tired of standing at your standing desk. A beautiful programmable mechanical music box may be a little too pricy. And mice embryos have been grown on the International Space Station.
Guest:

Steve Caplin


Published:
Simon Rose

The Bigger Picture: Starmer's Gaza position, the Covid inquiry, the AI summit and a Halloween general election?

Simon Rose
Original Broadcast:

The Bigger Picture

The Bigger Picture: Starmer's Gaza position, the Covid inquiry, the AI summit and a Halloween general election?
Political commentator Mike Indian looks at the way Gaza has exposed divisions in the UK's political parties and examines Keir Starmer's stance. He discusses the "macho culture" in Number Ten exposed by the Covid inquiry and points to lessons we should draw from it so far. He considers Rishi Sunak's AI summit and what it might lead to. And he speculates whether we might have a Halloween general election next year.
Guest:

Mike Indian


Published:
Gavin Oldham

Thought for the Week: What 'Love your enemy' means

Gavin Oldham
Original Broadcast:

Thought for the Week

Thought for the Week: What 'Love your enemy' means
This week's Thought proposes four key routes towards 'Loving your enemy', including a gradual transition from national to international law. This would mean justice not being constrained by national borders, so we could look forward to a system of international civil law enforcement replacing reliance on military force to resolve criminal outbreaks — it would also help us to resolve the challenges of climate change. Another element is restorative justice: Nelson Mandela and Desmond Tutu showed the world that such a system can provide a pathway to peace in the most challenging of circumstances. These initiatives, based on an understanding of unconditional love and an equitable sharing of resources, can provide a way forward from our current woes. Background music: 'Everything Has a Beginning' by Joel Cummins. Image source: United Nations

Published:
Georgie Frost

This Is Money: Pension blunders and why a bond spike is worrying investors

Georgie Frost
Original Broadcast:

This is Money

This Is Money: Pension blunders and why a bond spike is worrying investors
Georgie Frost, Simon Lambert and Tanya Jefferies discuss a new online service coming next Spring for state pension top-ups. Also, Simon looks at what's going on in the Bond market. There's also comment on premium bond values, and the team pick up a cause of local disputes: cameras in the back garden!
Guest:

Tanya Jefferies


Published:
Motley Fool Money

Motley Fool Money: Softness Ahead for Ads and Consumer Spend? (27/10)

Motley Fool Money
Original Broadcast:

Motley Fool Show

Motley Fool Money: Softness Ahead for Ads and Consumer Spend? (27/10)
Big tech is still benefiting from the push into the cloud, but digital advertising might be slowing down a bit. Earnings from the credit card companies help explain why. Emily Flippen and Jason Moser discuss big tech earnings – trends in cloud spend for Amazon, Microsoft, and Alphabet, and what ad market softness might mean for Meta, Visa and Mastercard earnings, and why consumer spend might lighten up a bit in Q4, and Spotify’s fantastic past twelve months and what investors should think now. Then, 19 minutes in, Motley Fool co-Founder and CEO Tom Gardner caught up with Michael Lewis at ONE: NYC about FTX, SBF, and the investing dynamics of Silicon Valley. Finally, 31 minutes in, Jason and Emily break down two stocks on their radar: Masimo and Okta. Stocks discussed: AMZN, META, GOOG, GOOGL, MSFT, V, MA, SPOT, OKTA, MASI. Host - Dylan Lewis; Guests - Jason Moser, Emily Flippen, Tom Gardner, Michael Lewis
Guests:

Jason Moser, Emily Flippen, Tom Gardner, Michael Lewis


Published:
Motley Fool Money

Motley Fool Money: Buffett's Advantage (22/10)

Motley Fool Money
Original Broadcast:

Motley Fool Show

Motley Fool Money: Buffett's Advantage (22/10)
When you have about $150 billion in cash on hand, you’re never out of position for making a decision. Shane Parrish is the founder of Farnam Street, the host of “The Knowledge Project” podcast, and the author of “Clear Thinking: Turning Ordinary Moments Into Extraordinary Results.” Mary Long caught up with Parrish to discuss decision making lessons from Warren Buffett, Charlie Munger, and Daniel Kahneman, how to create rules to become a more disciplined investor, and tips for writing an investment thesis. Tickers discussed: BRK.A, BRK.B. Host - Mary Long; Guest - Shane Parrish
Guest:

Shane Parrish


Published:
Adam Cox

The Hypnotist: Hooponopono Prayer for Forgiveness and Compassion

Adam Cox
Original Broadcast:

The Hypnotist

The Hypnotist: Hooponopono Prayer for Forgiveness and Compassion
Forgiveness is generally known as a two-way process: asking for it, and giving it. However, stress, resentment and anger can be bottled up inside you, and if the other party is not around — or perhaps has died leaving that unfinished business — it may be wise to move on from the emotional turbulence which can get in the way of a better quality of life. Adam Cox uses the Hooponopono prayer as the basis finding forgiveness and compassion based on love.

Published:
Simon Rose

The Bigger Picture: New Zealand farmers' rebellion, distrust of electric cars & private police forces

Simon Rose
Original Broadcast:

The Bigger Picture

The Bigger Picture: New Zealand farmers' rebellion, distrust of electric cars & private police forces
Professor Tim Evans of Middlesex University highlights a growing disillusionment around the world with governments and the services they provide. In New Zealand farmers have united to dismantle some of Jacinda Ardern's climate policies, UK polls show that the public overwhelmingly do not trust electric vehicles, which have many more disadvantages than were initially apparent and, again in the UK, major retailers are increasingly turning to private police companies to prosecute the shoplifters because the official police will not do so.
Guest:

Professor Tim Evans


Published:
Simon Rose

The Business of Film: Trolls Band Together, Killers of the Flower Moon & Barbie

Simon Rose
Original Broadcast:

The Business Of Film

The Business of Film: Trolls Band Together, Killers of the Flower Moon & Barbie
James Cameron-Wilson takes Simon Rose through the latest UK box office chart, with takings down 9%. Trolls Band Together, the third in the series, is the new #1 with a take of £3m. Martin Scorsese's Killers of the Flower Moon took £2.5m at #2. Majestic, brutal and based on a true story, James found Robert de Niro and Leonardo DiCaprio's acting overshadowed by Lily Gladstone, who is favourite to pick up the Best Actress Oscar. Impressive though the film is he thought it too long at three and a half hours. Watching Barbie again now it's out on DVD/BluRay, James was equally impressed and found many things to enjoy he had missed the first time. He also tells how it is getting around Russia's Hollywood movie ban.
Guest:

James Cameron-Wilson


Published:
Simon Rose

Gadgets & Gizmos: A 2-wheeled car, an AI chicken coop & an ultrasonic kitchen knife

Simon Rose
Original Broadcast:

Gadgets and Gizmos

Gadgets & Gizmos: A 2-wheeled car, an AI chicken coop & an ultrasonic kitchen knife
Steve Caplin delves into the world of tech. The Hoverboard inventor has designed a 2-wheeled balancing car. For £2m, you can get a 15-foot high transforming robot. Driverless taxis are getting harder to hail in San Francisco. There's an AI-powered chicken coop (with Albert Eggstein). There's a crowdfunded ultrasonic kitchen knife. The Swedish Academy Dictionary, started in 1883, is out but with words like "allergy" and "computer" missing. Scientists have discovered that flipping a coin does not, after all, give you a 50/50 result while others have found that the solution to sitting for too long is to go for a walk.
Guest:

Steve Caplin


Published: