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Gavin Oldham

Thought for the Week: Parenting Under Pressure

Gavin Oldham
Original Broadcast:

Thought for the Week

Thought for the Week: Parenting Under Pressure
The scars borne by the younger generation reflect parents under pressure: from relationship breakdown, the demands of work, migration, the cost of living. So we must look intelligently at the journey towards adulthood, responding particularly to the call for reason, and underpin it with the firm foundation of unconditional love. Background music: 'Generations Away' by Unicorn Heads

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Georgie Frost

This Is Money: Could the most hated tax in Britain be axed?

Georgie Frost
Original Broadcast:

This is Money

This Is Money: Could the most hated tax in Britain be axed?
It’s been called the most hated tax in Britain - but only 4% of people pay it. You could be forgiven for thinking inheritance tax is something only the super-rich need to worry about. But thanks to rising house prices and an increasing desire to transfer wealth between generations, more and more people are being drawn into the net. It happens not only when someone is left property or other assets from someone's estate, but also when they accept a gift from someone who passes away before the 'seven year rule' tax exemption kicks in. The Institute for Fiscal Studies says that that 4% could become 12% within a decade. And many of those who will never pay inheritance tax still hate the idea that the Government is taking a big cut of the wealth people have worked hard to build up over their lifetime. So it might come as welcome news that Rishi Sunak is reported to be considering cutting the tax, or even scrapping it altogether, as a potential vote-winner ahead of the next election. What’s wrong with inheritance tax, how could it be made fairer - and could the Government really just get rid of it? Simon Lambert, Helen Crane and Georgie Frost discuss. That’s not the only plan the Government is said to be hatching for our finances. It’s also reported that Chancellor Jeremy Hunt wants to increase the £20,000 annual allowance for saving into an ISA - but only for those who use it to invest money into companies listed on the ailing London Stock Exchange. The team consider what puts people off stocks and shares ISAs, whether the rules are too restrictive for the way we manage our money today, and whether encouraging people to pour money into a market which has had a bit of a tough time of late is a good idea. Plus, it’s a year since the disastrous mini-Budget which rocked the mortgage market. With a raft of reductions from big lenders this week, could rates on home loans finally be turning a corner now the base rate has been put on ice? And finally, we discuss whether the time might finally have come to commit to a fixed rate on your energy bills.
Guest:

Helen Crane


Published:
Motley Fool Money

Motley Fool Money: How Fools Use ETFs (26/9)

Motley Fool Money
Original Broadcast:

Motley Fool Show

Motley Fool Money: How Fools Use ETFs (26/9)
We like stocks. We also like exchange traded funds (ETFs). But first, Ricky Mulvey and Jim Gillies discuss a difficult stretch for small-cap stocks, Costco’s new healthcare offering, and one piece of Costco’s valuation that’s often forgotten by investors. Plus, Robert Brokamp and Alison Southwick find out how Fools use ETFs in their portfolios. Companies/ETFs mentioned: COST, CIBR. Hosts - Ricky Mulvey, Alison Southwick; Guests - Jim Gillies, Robert Brokamp, Kirsten Guerra, Jason Moser, Bill Mann
Guests:

Jim Gillies, Robert Brokamp, Kirsten Guerra, Jason Moser, Bill Mann


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Motley Fool Money

Motley Fool Money: Containing Big Tech (24/9)

Motley Fool Money
Original Broadcast:

Motley Fool Show

Motley Fool Money: Containing Big Tech (24/9)
When your information is everywhere, is it possible to rein it back in? Deidre Woollard caught up with Tom Kemp, a cybersecurity expert and author of “Containing Big Tech: How to Protect our Civil Rights, Economy, and Democracy.” They discuss the implications of biometric data collection in a world where big tech runs rampant, which companies are getting the privacy game right (and wrong), Angel investing, and workarounds to weak links in existing cybersecurity systems. Tickers discussed: META, AAPL, AMZN, GOOG, GOOGL, MSFT. Host - Deidre Woollard; Guest - Tom Kemp
Guest:

Tom Kemp


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Adam Cox

The Hypnotist: The Inner Child Tesseract

Adam Cox
Original Broadcast:

The Hypnotist

The Hypnotist: The Inner Child Tesseract
This episode is about inter-generational scarring, how it's possible to come to terms with it — and how to be aware of the risk that it can cascade through the generations if left unresolved. The challenges experienced by those with disrupted childhoods can result in undesirable coping strategies and constant struggles to prove one's worth. Adam Cox discusses how to contend with the absence of guidance or role models, using the imagery of the tesseract (the generalization of a cube to four dimensions: a concept in geometry and mathematics that serves to illustrate higher dimensions. Tesseracts are a way of showing how the fourth dimension relates to the third). Image source: Wikipedia

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Simon Rose

The Bigger Picture: The financial inadequacies hurting the UK, HS2 & climate policy and working longer

Simon Rose
Original Broadcast:

The Bigger Picture

The Bigger Picture: The financial inadequacies hurting the UK, HS2 & climate policy and working longer
Professor Tim Evans of Middlesex University laments the profligacy of Government and the failure of the Bank of England to get a grip on inflation. He compares it to the disastrous mid-70s, saying the Bank is failing badly. He looks at the shifting sands of HS2 and climate policy, explaining why the UK is so bad at infrastructure. And he finds a positive in the fact that so many people are choosing to continue to work beyond conventional retirement age.
Guest:

Professor Tim Evans


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Simon Rose

The Business of Film: Expendables 4, Dumb Money & Flora and Son

Simon Rose
Original Broadcast:

The Business Of Film

The Business of Film: Expendables 4, Dumb Money & Flora and Son
James Cameron-Wilson laments the current state of the UK box office, down 20% WOW & 35% YOY. He hates Expendables 4, limping in at #2 wth a mere £760,000. Paul Dano stars in Dumb Money, #5, about the Gamestop story. However, James found it utterly baffling and felt he'd already seen the film after watching the trailer. He was, however, very impressed by Flora & Son on Apple TV, an Irish film from the director of Once, Begin Again and Sing Street, about the transformative power of music. He ends with a tribute to the late Sir Michael Gambon.
Guest:

James Cameron-Wilson


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Simon Rose

The Financial Outlook for Personal Investors: How investors should view share buybacks

Simon Rose
Original Broadcast:

The Financial Outlook for Personal Investors

The Financial Outlook for Personal Investors: How investors should view share buybacks
Russ Mould of A J Bell discusses share buybacks. Long popular in the United States, he notes that they are currently down by a fifth YOY, pointing out that previous peaks coincided with market tops. In the UK, many of our biggest companies have engaged in buybacks, particularly in the financial field. With the FTSE yielding 3.9%, buybacks are adding another 2.3%. While private investors don't usually participate directly, their equity stake rises. Russ explains the ins and outs of share buybacks from a private investor's point of view.
Guest:

Russ Mould


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Simon Rose

Gadgets & Gizmos: Alexa upgrade, Meta's smart glasses, Medieval murders & AI art copyright

Simon Rose
Original Broadcast:

Gadgets and Gizmos

Gadgets & Gizmos: Alexa upgrade, Meta's smart glasses, Medieval murders & AI art copyright
Steve Caplin talks tech with Simon Rose. Alexa is to become more conversational while Meta has launched smart Ray-Ban glasses with AI. A website will show you the grisly details of medieval murders, while Swedish scientists believe they can resurrect a carnivorous marsupial from Tasmania. Mini launches its first eBike while there are improvements to car roof boxes and head torches. While Amazon is trying to limit the number of AI-written books, the US Copyright Office has ruled that art created with AI can not be copyrighted.
Guest:

Steve Caplin


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Gavin Oldham

Thought for the Week: Cummings' Unintended Legacy

Gavin Oldham
Original Broadcast:

Thought for the Week

Thought for the Week: Cummings' Unintended Legacy
After the December 2019 election, Dominic Cummings brought HM Treasury under the heel of No. 10. Little did he realise that in 2023 the financiers would be running the whole show. Rishi Sunak, financier par excellence, thinks he is making long-term decisions for a brighter future. Not everyone agrees: but then a week is a long time in politics — or finance, come to that. Background music: 'Something Is Wrong' by Sir Cubworth Image source: BBC

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